All posts by admin

Confederate Cemetery

Washington Avenue, Fredericksburg, Virginia

The Confederate Cemetery was dedicated in 1870.  Over 3,300 soldiers are buried in the cemetery and over 2,100 are unknown.  The cemetery also includes the remains of six Confederate generals but only General Abner Perrin was killed during the war. Generals Seth Barton, Dabney Maury, Daniel Ruggles, Henry Sibley and Carter Stevenson all survived the war.
Continue reading Confederate Cemetery

Mary Washington Monument and Meditation Rock

Washington Avenue, Fredericksburg, Virginia

Photo of Mary Washingtom Monument May 19, 1864
Original Monument 1864

When Mary Washington died in 1789, she was buried at her request near her favorite spot were she spent many hours meditating and praying.  In 1833, President Andrew Jackson laid a cornerstone for a marble monument at the site with over 5,000 people present.  However, the monument was never completed and the partially erected monument was badly damaged during the Battle of Fredericksburg in 1862.  After numerous unsuccessful appeals to the government for a new monument, the National Mary Washington Memorial Association was formed.  Donations were collected from women throughout the country for the funds to complete the monument.  The new granite monument was finally completed and unveiled by President Grover Cleveland in May 1894. Continue reading Mary Washington Monument and Meditation Rock

Thomas Jefferson Religious Freedom Monument

Washington Avenue, Fredericksburg Virginia

Portrait of Thomas Jefferson by Rembrandt Peale circa 1800
Thomas Jefferson by Rembrandt Peale in 1800

The Thomas Jefferson Religious Freedom Monument commemorates the Virginia Religious Freedom Statue which states that “no man shall suffer on account of his religious opinions and beliefs.” Thomas Jefferson regarded this statue as one of his accomplishment. Dedicated on October 16, 1932, the 200th anniversary of George Washington’s birth. The stones for the monument were taken from churches throughout the country. In 1977 the monument was moved from its original location on George Street to its current location on Washington Avenue.

Photo of the Religious Freedom Monument, Fredericksburg, VAPhoto of the Religious Freedom Monument Plaque, Fredericksburg, Virginia

Dr. Leidecker Plaque Fredericksburg, Virginia

IN MEMORY AND APPRECIATIONS
OF
DR. KURT F. LEIDECKER
(1902-1991)
FOUNDER AND DIRECTOR
OF
THE THOMAS JEFFERSON INSTITUTE
FOR THE
STUD OF RELIGIOUS FREEDOM
AND
BY WHOSE EFFORTS
THIS MONUMENT WAS RELOCATED TO THIS SITE.

 

Hugh Mercer’s Apothecary Shop

Consider combining the two Hugh Mercer posts.

1020 Caroline Street, Fredericksburg, Virginia

Dr. Hugh Mercer practiced medicine and kept an apothecary for a number of years before joining the Revolutionary army.  Dr. Mercer was a good friend of George Washington and Washington kept a desk in the Apothecary Shop where he transacted business when in Fredericksburg.

Hugh Mercer Apothecary Shop PC, Fredericksburg, VA

On January 12, 1777, Brigadier General Mercer died from wounds suffered at the Battle of Princeton.

Related Posts:

Old Stone Warehouse

The Old Stone Warehouse is located on the corner of Sophia and William streets in Old Town Fredericksburg, Virginia.  The warehouse circa 1813 was built by businessman and patriot Thomas Goodwin.  Continue reading Old Stone Warehouse

Hugh Mercer Monument

 Washington Avenue, Fredericksburg, Virginia

The Hugh Mercer Monument, a bronze statue by sculptor Edward Valentine, was erected in 1906 by the U.S. Government. 

Photo of the Hugh Mercer Monument Fredericksburg, Virginia“SACRED TO THE MEMORY OF HUGH MERCER, BRIGADIER GENERAL IN THE ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES. HE DIED ON THE 12TH JANUARY, 1777 OF THE WOUNDS HE RECEIVED ON THE 2ND OF THE SAME MONTH. NEAR PRINCETOWN, IN NEW JERSEY, BRAVELY DEFENDING THE LIBERTIES OF AMERICA, THE CONGRESS OF THE UNITED STATES IN TESTIMONY OF HIS VIRTUES, AND THEIR GRATITUDE, HAVE CAUSED THIS MONUMENT TO BE ERECTED.”

Hugh Mercer’s grandson was Hugh Weedon Mercer a Confederate General in the Civil War and General George S. Patton was a great, great grandson of Hugh Mercer.

Dr. Hugh Mercer practiced medicine and kept an Apothecary Shop in Fredericksburg before joining the Revolutionary army.  Dr.  Mercer was good friend of George Washington.

John Paul Jones House

501 Caroline Street, Fredericksburg, Virginia

501 Caroline Street Plaque

During a period of his youth, John Paul lived at 501 Caroline in Fredericksburg, Virginia with his brother, William.  John Paul Jones (July 6, 1747 — July 18, 1792) is buried at Annapolis and his brother William is buried in the St. George’s Cemetery in Fredericksburg.

The two photos below show a 1928 and 2011 view of the house where John Paul Jones lived with his brother, William.  When the first photo was taken it was the C&G Grocery Store and Caroline Street was called Main Street. The home is a private residence today.

1928 View of the John Paul Jones House
2011 View of the John Paul Jones House

The plaque below is located on the right corner of the home. See the photos above.

1910 John Paul Jones House Plaque

At 28 John Paul was forced to flee to Virginia to escape charges of murdering a mutinous John Jones Headstone Fredericksburg VAcrew member and changed his name to avoid being found. No one really knows why John Paul selected  “Jones” for his last name. However, it is interesting to note that there is a John Jones headstone dated 1752 within thirty feet of his brother William’s gave in the St. George’s Cemetery in Fredericksburg. Maybe seeing the John Jones name on this headstone inspired him to choose “Jones” as his last name.

John Paul Jones 1947 First Day Cover

President James Monroe

James Monroe Museum
908 Charles Street, Fredericksburg, Virginia

Protrait of President MonroeJames Monroe started his political career in Fredericksburg as a councilman. President James Monroe served two terms as the 5th President of the United States (1817-1825) and was the author of the Monroe Doctrine. The Fredericksburg Museum and Memorial Library has a vast collection of the personal possessions used by President Monroe in the White House, including the desk on which he signed the Monroe Doctrine.

Continue reading President James Monroe

Gunnery Spring

Gunnery Road, Fredericksburg, Virginia

Gunnery Spring was the site of an old Revolutionary War Gun factory in Fredericksburg owned by Fielding Lewis and where his lost his fortune. Continue reading Gunnery Spring